Administration of Justice

AOJThe Administration of Justice program at Southwestern Illinois College prepares students for careers in all levels of law enforcement, as well as entry-level corrections and private security positions.

Individuals interested in a career in law enforcement must have good communication skills and an understanding of human behavior and motivation. They will be required to effectively use these skills in conjunction with their knowledge of criminal law and procedures to make critical decisions that directly impact the lives of others. Physical fitness is also an important component for individuals interested in a career in law enforcement. Some positions will require a physical fitness test.

In addition to the AOJ degree and certificate options, the college also offers a 10-week intensive Police Academy program, which is certified by the Illinois Law Enforcement Training and Standards Board. Opportunities exist for civilians to apply as an intern to the SWIC Police Academy program. For more information and eligibility requirements on the intern program, view the Police Academy Intern program link.

For more information on the Administration of Justice program, please contact Program Coordinator Van Muschler at 618-235-2700, ext. 5396 or 5653, or van.muschler@swic.edu 

Educational Programs

Degree

The AAS degree program incorporates studies in written and oral communication, social and behavioral sciences and specialized courses in constitutional law, criminal procedures and investigation, and other areas of criminal justice. View cost sheet.

Students who are interested in pursuing a bachelor's degree in Administration of Justice should contact the AOJ program coordinator or the Counseling Center for specifics on course transferability.   

Certificates

Career Opportunities

According to the U.S. Department of Labor Statistics, the opportunities in local police departments will be excellent for those who meet the psychological, personal and physical qualifications. Employment for correctional officers is expected to grow 16 percent between 2006 and 2016, and security guard positions are growing faster than the average for all occupations. 

For more information regarding the field of policing, correctional officers or security officers, refer to the U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Handbook.

Visit the SWIC Career Activities and Employment Center for career exploration and mentoring opportunities.